Classic Cars And Where To Start

The key to investing in classic cars is to know about what your investing in, if you are interested in a certain car to start you down the road spend time on research. What owner clubs are there, are spares reasonably easy to get hold of, and so on.

Are you are a car lover, of a sentimental generation, or simply one who would like a cool ride, buying classic cars is your best bet. Restoring these older cars is probably one of the most rewarding, albeit expensive, of all the hobbies you can take on. But surprisingly, auto insurance for these cars is much cheaper than regular car insurance and is much different than insurance for a regular everyday car.

One of the areas that differs considerably between modern and classic cars is deprecation, buy wisely and appreciation is more likely. Restoration of any of the more mature cars is one hobby that a lot of people have and just seem to sink a ton of money into. Buying and restoring classic cars is a popular hobby for many car enthusiasts but is rarely a straightforward task.

Finding your ideal car, and restoring classic cars is a popular, and also time consuming and expensive, hobby for many automobile enthusiasts.

The mileage and engine is hardly ever an issue as the mechanics of the older cars and classic cars are normally very robust. As with anything, knowing what to look for and where to find it when it comes to scouting out your project car is paramount. The only way that an individual can keep abreast with all activities and events relating to classic cars is by joining the car club specializing in your chosen car.

Finding classic cars is not normally all that difficult but if you need a certain make or model, it could prove to be a challenge. And of course, the most rewarding part when it comes to owning and collecting classic cars is that you get to have a cool ride. Looking back and watching these cars is just like reliving the days when they were still roaming the streets, pure nostalgia. Restoration of classic cars is a wonderful past time for a lot people around the world, but go carefully, your wallet can soon be emptied.

And when you have your dream car, then what? Use it, of course.

Just imagine turning up to, say, a murder mystery night in your new wheels and dressed in period costume, what a start to your night, what a great talking point and you never know you may meet a like minded soul and spend the night talking about your classic and totally forget why you were there in the first place.

Heady days!

RUST – The Enemy of All Car Owners Part 1 – Why Iron Rusts

Rust is the enemy of all car owners. Rust is that nasty brown stuff which destroys the bodywork of our cars, which causes our paintwork to bubble and blister, which is the downfall of our chassis and which causes our car to fail that vital MOT. Rust is the final dust into which our cars will crumble.

Rust is the oxide of iron that results from a chemical reaction: the oxidation of iron by atmospheric oxygen. There are in fact three kinds of iron oxides. These are known chemically as FeO, which is a black powder, Fe2O3 which is a brown-red powder, and Fe3O4 which is a mixture of the other two.

Iron will only rust in the presence of moisture. If you had an iron nail in a jar of oxygen with absolutely no moisture present the iron nail would never rust. Add some moisture and rusting will happen quite quickly, add a sprinkle of salt and it will happen very rapidly indeed.

When things go rusty a quite complex electro-chemical process is taking place. When iron is in contact with water that contains some dissolved oxygen, something called a solution tension is created. This will vary over the surface and will result in different electrical potentials. In the relatively electropositive regions the iron will dissolve forming positive iron II ions. At the electronegative regions negative hydroxyl ions (OH-) are formed. These react with the iron to form iron hydroxides which are insoluble. The iron II ions that are in solution react with hydrogen ions to form iron III ions which react with the hydroxide ions to form hydrated iron oxides. When these dry out they form rust. The greater the initial number of hydrogen ions (the lower the pH) and the more conductive the water (for instance the greater the concentration of road salt) the faster the rusting takes place.

When the rusting process has gone too far, the car parts that have corroded are irretrievable and will need to be replaced. Nowadays it is relatively easy to purchase these online, however prevention is better than cure and in the next article of this series we will examine ways to prevent rust. 

RUST – The Enemy of All Car Owners Part 2 – Rust Prevention

In part 1 of these articles we looked at why things rust and the chemistry of rusting. In this article we will look at some of the ways we can prevent rusting taking place and how to deal with rusted components. If the rust has gone too far then the car parts will need to be replaced, and although obtaining replacement parts online is relatively easy, it is better to prevent rust in the first place.

We have already shown that for rusting to take place there have to be three components present. These are iron, water and oxygen. If we can exclude any one of these then we will prevent rust. We also know that if the water is more acid and contains things like dissolved road salt then rusting will be more rapid.

One way to prevent rusting is to isolate these components, for instant using paint. Paints keep out moisture to a large extent, but they are not impenetrable by moisture. Good quality car paint will prevent moisture penetration for many years, but eventually, as it is subject to the rigours of heat, cold, surface abrasion by dust and atmospheric pollution it will become less resistant and allow moisture to penetrate. One way of helping paint maintain its protective properties is by refreshing the surface using wax.

Regular waxing of car paintwork is highly recommended and to ensure that this is maintained you should never allow the paint surface to become hydrophilic, it should always be hydrophobic. You can tell if this is the case by looking at water droplets on the paint surface. If they form tiny separate water droplets then you have a hydrophobic surface and are protected against rust, if the water droplets smear out into a film then the surface is hydrophobic and re-waxing is required.

The best way of waxing your car is to use a hand applied proprietary car wax rather than a wax additive in a car wash which are not as effective. First you should ensure that your car is spotlessly clean. Take a damp sponge and either smear it with wax or apply wax to the car surface. Apply the wax evenly over a section of the car. Let it sit for a few minutes, then polish it away.